Health

View from inside an MRI scanner of a young woman about to be scanned

A study that showed changes in the brain in those at risk of developing bipolar disorder raises new hope about early intervention.

Male and female medical staff bandage a limb in an operation theatre

These three common surgeries have been found to be of little to no benefit, but thousands are still performed every year.

man wearing hat looking out onto the water

If you’ve had a skin cancer check lately, you might have been told to consider adding a daily vitamin B3 pill to your skin safety regime.

Elgene Lim

Professor Elgene Lim has been recognised for his outstanding outcomes in breast cancer research.

crocodile-front_on97_copy.png

When it comes to seeking medical care after an animal bite, experts say to ‘make it snappy’ to avoid an infection that’s worse than the bite.

Close-up of a bag of blood on a drip stand in a hospital

New research will estimate the proportion of the population who have been infected with COVID-19 - even if they didn’t have symptoms or get a test.

A woman sitting on the toilet prepares to use some toilet paper

Two Australians with bipolar have been successfully treated with poo transplants, allowing them to come off, or reduce, their medications. Here’s where the science is up to.

Rebecca Guy

Professor Rebecca Guy has been honoured for her public health work for vulnerable communities, such as point-of-care testing for STIs and COVID-19.

kate fasse in front of an illustration of floating pills and medicines

Is it possible that up to half the side effects reported in medical trials are all in people's heads? Is someone's expectation of a negative side effect strong enough to make it actually happen? And if so, how do medical researchers break this dangerous cycle?

baby

We looked at almost 300,000 births and found those mothers in the private system were more likely to have a caesarean – even if they didn’t really want or need one.

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