Science & Tech

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A UNSW-led geological analysis of the site where a 6000-year old human skull was discovered in Papua New Guinea in 1929 has revealed that the person most likely died in a catastrophic tsunami.

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Pharmacies play a larger role in the community than just dispensing medications, writes Helen Dickinson.

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Darren Curnoe answers the question: Where did the first person come from?

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There is no evidence to support the efficacy of any of the 17 most popular "alternative" therapies, writes John Dwyer

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For their work in childhood cancer, oceanography, and solar cell technology, UNSW researchers have won three prestigious NSW Premier’s Prizes for Science and Engineering.

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Reel Life Survey is a 10 year citizen science project that trains volunteer scuba divers to survey marine plants and animals. Madeleine De Gabriele interviewed Adriana Vergés, Graham Edgar and Stewart Frusher.

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Marine scientists from UNSW Sydney and the Sydney Institute of Marine Science (SIMS) have won the NSW Government’s Natural Environment Award for an innovative project to restore crayweed forests to Sydney’s foreshores.

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New technology is revealing the mechanical aspects of cells and mechanobiology is enabling the development of new drugs and treatments, write Joshua Chou, Kate Poole and Maté Biro.

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Walter Munk's contribution to oceanography has earned him the nickname "Einstein of the ocean". Paul Spence and Shane Keating recap his achievements as he turns 100.

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The development of agriculture marked the greatest shift in human history, but it came with consequences, writes Darren Curnoe.

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