Science & Tech

coffee_pods_used_in_the_unsw_green_aluminium_research.jpg

A recycling breakthrough at UNSW Sydney offers new possibilities for the re-purposing of polymer-laminated aluminium products, such as food and coffee packaging.

Close-up of an elephant using its trunk to grip and eat food

An invention similar to an elephant’s trunk has potential benefits for many industries where handling delicate objects is essential, say the UNSW researchers who developed it.

amager bakke power plant in copenhagen denmark

Waste-to-energy incinerators could help Australia deal with its mounting waste crisis, but burning rubbish may come with risks to public health.

Professor Paul Curmi

In an Australian first, UNSW Sydney's Paul Curmi will use a European Research Council Synergy grant to develop an artificial biological molecular engine.

Day and night at the Anglo Australian Telescope

The Australian-led GALAH project has released chemical information for 600,000 stars.

emily wong and mathias francois

A jelly-like sea sponge has helped shed light on an elusive part of the human genome, with implications for biomedical research and healthcare.

a finger points to an electronic control panel

The Internet of Things will transform industry, agriculture, and our cities. But we need to consider carefully the risks as well as the rewards.

matthew england

UNSW Professor Matthew England explains the science behind annual ozone depletion, why this year’s ozone hole is larger and deeper, and what the means for the future of our climate.

Video Credit: Global Science TV

Woman clutching stomach

Bacteria from the mouth could hold clues to understanding – and potentially treating – severe ulcerative colitis, a painful bowel disease.

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