Science & Tech

la nina

After one La Niña, the Pacific sometimes retains cool water which enables a second La Niña to form.

Sad-looking spaniel sitting on a lounge chair looking out the window to a dreary day

Have La Niña’s storms got your furry friend feeling stressed? A UNSW Sydney animal ecologist gives advice on how to help them – and you – get through the dreary days.

Sydney Funnel-web spider

A UNSW spider researcher is hoping to learn a lot more about the world’s most venomous spider. 

Solar panels on suburban roof tops

Almost one in three Australian homes now have solar panels – but as even more solar systems are installed, we face a growing challenge of managing temporary solar shutdowns. 

settlement on mars

UNSW Engineering stories this year were filled with great discoveries, including the missing jigsaw piece in quantum computing to a new way of making green ammonia.

Kirsten Banks

When we gaze upwards and look at stars, we’re looking back in time. On a clear night, anyone with access to a patch of night sky can see light that has travelled unfathomable distances and stars that have been twinkling for millions and millions of years.

Dark gray-blue storm clouds. La nina and superstorm concept.

UNSW has a range of experts available to comment on La Niña.

Kendelle Murphy, Frances Byrne, Antoine de Weck, Brooke Pereira, Abba Habibalahi, Benjamin Daniels and Ben Smith

Medicine, science and biomedical engineering academics receive grants to explore new approaches to cancer treatment.

discarded white goods on Maitland Road Mayfield

Countries all over the world who want to report their global material footprint will benefit from a new research platform.

David Keith 2

Professor David Keith has been recognised for demonstrating environmental leadership in ecosystem management.

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