e-waste

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The world’s first microfactory that can transform the components from electronic waste (e-waste) items such as discarded smart phones and laptops into valuable materials for re-use has been launched at UNSW Sydney, with the Minister for the Environment, Gabrielle Upton, in attendance.

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As Australia's waste crisis escalates, Professor Veena Sahajwalla today launched the world's first e-waste microfactory which has the potential to reduce the vast amount of electronic waste heading into landfill.

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The Australian Human Rights Institute is a new initiative at UNSW Sydney that is bringing together researchers from different disciplines to find solutions to human rights challenges.

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A UNSW Sustainability recycling program that diverts a tonne of batteries away from landfill each year is a finalist in the Green Gown Awards. 

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How do you tackle the problem when you discover that your University's waste contains hundreds of kilos of batteries that could be recycled? That was the question facing UNSW Sustainability.

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UNSW New Generation Network Scholar Vaibhav Gaikwad is reframing Australia-India relations while turning mountains of e-waste into valuable products - including a set of Gandhi spectacles that symbolise India's bid to clean up its environment.

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Professor Veena Sahajwalla has pioneered an Australian solution to the global e-waste crisis, developing microfactories to turn unwanted electronics into valuable metal alloys. 

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If Australia is to effectively manage e-waste, it needs to expand its National Waste Policy to include the recovery and recycling of a much wider range of electrical products, writes Graciela Metternicht.

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Australia’s management of electronic waste is poorly implemented, lags behind international best practice, and is based on outdated recycling targets, UNSW researchers say.

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Scientia Professor Veena Sahajwalla is researching the productive recycling of e-waste to create raw materials for future manufacturing.

 

For more videos like this visit the UNSWTV homepage.

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