Emeritus Professor Hal Wootten passed away during the night of 27 July, leaving behind a world where the law can finally meet justice.

GP with patient

The project will support those living with a rare disease, focusing on mental health, and social and emotional wellbeing. Photo: Shutterstock.

UNSW Sydney researchers have been awarded $1.9 million for a project that will develop and deliver rare disease resources, education and training.

Great Southern Ocean

The Southern Ocean has the highest potential for carbon capture by an ocean. Photo: Shutterstock.

We need to investigate how the ocean’s immense potential for atmospheric carbon dioxide removal can be harnessed to reduce the impacts of climate change.

People waiting in line with masks on

Herd immunity is when immunity in a population is high enough to block the pathway for the ongoing transmission of the disease. Photo: Mick Tsikas/AAP

Once we achieve herd immunity, people who are not vaccinated benefit indirectly from the immunity of those around them. But it’s not easy to say exactly when we’ll reach this threshold for COVID-19.

A person walking down the street with an umbrella

The Indian Ocean Dipole, or IOD, is a natural climate phenomenon that influences rainfall patterns around the Indian Ocean, including Australia. Photo: Shutterstock

Last week the Bureau of Meteorology declared a negative Indian Ocean Dipole — a natural climate phenomenon set to bring wet weather. Let’s look at what you can expect, and the role of climate change.

golden sun shines across solar panels on a roof

In Australia, more than two million rooftops have solar panels - the most per capita in the world. Photo: Shutterstock

The process of manufacturing gallium-doped solar panels was under a patent until last year. It's only now that this method has started to pick up steam.

Engineering researchers

The ARC Industrial Transformation Research Program supports collaborative research activity between industry and the Australian higher education sector. Photo: Shutterstock.

More than $9 million in ARC grants have been awarded to two UNSW Sydney projects providing research into sensors for the health sector and new technologies for Australia’s infrastructure needs.

kirby cells

In this video, watch how the SARS-CoV-2 virus takes over cells by ‘melting’ them into each other.

Researchers at UNSW Sydney’s Kirby Institute have developed cells that allow them to test the effect of SARS-CoV-2 faster than anywhere else in the world. 

The team, led by Associate Professor Stuart Turville, use these genetically “supercharged” cells to quickly understand the dynamics of different variants of the virus, to test their ability to evade vaccines, and to inform the public health response in real time.

The scientists have now shared microscopic footage of the process – in their incredible video, you can see the healthy supercharged cells being taken over by the SARS-CoV-2 virus over a 20-hour period.

Aerial view of a typical suburb in Australia

National home-ownership rates have fallen and the ownership rate for under 35s has collapsed, building in structural problems for future decades. Photo: Shutterstock

Regulators need to take action to prevent older Australians from borrowing against their superannuation to upgrade their housing and help rein in unsustainable property prices.

masked man waits for the light rail in sydney

Photo: Bianca De Marchi/AAP

In Hong Kong, SARS created a new social norm, where people accepted mask use as part of their 'civic responsibility'.

collapsed apartment building in miami with rescue crew

Photo: Miami-Dade Fire Rescue/AP/AAP

The Miami apartment collapse is a grim reminder of why engineering matters, and why comprehensive education in ethics should be embedded in the training of engineers.

See, no crying or big needles, just a person of colour showing off his plaster

Photo: Shutterstock

Our well-meaning efforts to use images to help demystify the vaccination process or share our pride in getting a COVID vaccine can backfire.

variant of SARS-CoV-2

Associate Professor Stuart Turville from UNSW Sydney and the Kirby Institute's Immunovirology and Pathogenesis Program explains how variants emerge, how they are detected and what we know about the B.1617 variant.

Covid 19 and dementia

Dr Katya Numbers from the Centre for Healthy Brain Ageing (CHeBA) discusses how the COVID-19 pandemic has posed unique risks to people with Alzheimer's disease and dementia. Dr Numbers' research has revealed people living with dementia have a relatively high risk of contracting severe COVID-19 and are also at risk of neuropsychiatric disturbances as a result of lockdown measures and social isolation.