Gigi Foster


Having money helps, but economists are learning there are other things we need to feel happy, writes Gigi Foster.

trickle down economics

The basic idea of trickle-down economics is that giving economic help to companies or people at the top of society should generate benefits for those in layers further down, writes Gigi Foster.


The present Australian social security and welfare system can be viewed as a UBI scheme with exceptions for people who don't need it, writes Gigi Foster.


A case involving a university's suppression of academic research into racism raises troubling questions, writes Gigi Foster.

Harbour houses

While many fortunes have been accumulated through hard work and invention, many more are the result of unfair advantage, new research shows.


A huge proportion of Australia's richest people are amassing their wealth via political connections rather than via business innovation, write Paul Frijters and Gigi Foster.

Political donations

Universities must remain non-partisan in order to avoid perverting the intent of the public dollars that underwrite them, write Gigi Foster and Paul Frijters.


We know perfectly well how to reduce inequality and tackle political favouritism and rent-seeking. The question is almost entirely one of political will, write Gigi Foster and Paul Frijters.

academic standards, graduation

Applying an economic lens to higher education in Australia can help to explain the furore over academic standards and possibly suggest some remedies, writes Gigi Foster.


University research systems could benefit from an 'ethics jury' to protect human participants while ensuring research is supported rather than strangled, writes Gigi Foster.