IVF

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Medicine undergraduate Aengus Tran is using AI to help embryologists improve IVF pregnancy rates.

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A review of 6 million pregnancies has found that pregnancies after assisted reproduction technologies, such as IVF, are at a higher risk of placental complications, compared to those following natural conception.

 

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The latest report on Assisted Reproductive Techonology in Australia and New Zealand reveals that for the first time, more babies are born from IVF treatment using frozen embryos.

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Many couples undergo multiple rounds of IVF. New stats give a more meaningful picture of the chances of having a baby, whether it’s the first or subsequent round of IVF, writes Georgina Chambers

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The chances of having a baby following IVF treatment are steadily improving, according to a new UNSW report.

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A simpler, cheaper infertility treatment that uses fewer drugs and potentially proviing an alternative to IVF is just over the horizon, writes Robert Gilchrist, William Ledger and Jeremy Thompson.

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Australian and Belgian medical scientists have discovered how to improve a woman’s chances of becoming pregnant using a less invasive and cheaper alternative to IVF. 

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IVF cycles using embryos that have been frozen and thawed are just as successful as fresh embryos, according to a new UNSW report.

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While assisted reproductive technology has solved fertility problems for many people, there’s often little fertility specialists can offer a woman much over 40, apart from egg donation, writes William Ledger.

 

Fertility

With powerful social forces causing women and men to delay having children, the scientific race is on to assist couples to reproduce later in life. Join fertility specialist William Ledger and social researcher Mark McCrindle as they discuss the issues in the UNSW Medicine Dean’s Lecture.

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