Science & Tech

science research

Australia needs stronger STEM skills and knowledge in parliament so politicians can understand the basics underpinning today’s significant issues, writes Les Field.

Engineering education

Such an arbitrary move would hobble Australian industry at a time when companies are crying out for engineers to help take innovations to market, writes Mark Hoffman.

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Renowned British primatologist Jane Goodall and American physicist Brian Greene are among leading international scientists who will give talks in Sydney this year through UNSW Science partnerships.

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Australia's recent heatwave is a taste of what our future will bring unless humans can rapidly and deeply cut our greenhouse emissions, write Sarah Perkins-Kirkpatrick, Andrew King and Matthew Hale.

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Be alert but not alarmed about the issues surrounding gene therapy, writes Merlin Crossley.

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The discovery of extremely high levels of pollution at the bottom of two of the Earth’s deepest oceanic trenches highlights the far-reaching impact of human activities, says UNSW marine ecologist Katherine Dafforn.

Emma Johnston

Unprecedented "marches for science" through major cities across the globe in April will bring leading scientists, including Nobel Laureates, together around  a political, and a more fundamental, challenge, writes Emma Johnston.

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The Composites Manufacturing Robot located at UNSW’s Automated Composites Laboratory uses narrow carbon or glass fibre tape to create custom composite parts up to three metres long. It is the only one of its type in the Southern Hemisphere.

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In a case of sophisticated scientific sleuthing, a UNSW researcher has helped pin down the source of an unprecedented outbreak of streptococcal disease in China.

Q fever

The changes we are making to the planet have become so profound that we seemingly hold the evolutionary fate of millions of species in our hands, writes Darren Curnoe.

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