Andy Baker

Water gushes into a large stone tub in a green field

When groundwater comes to the surface, sunlight and air convert organic molecules to greenhouse gases. That’s going to be a problem as we will need this water more as the world warms.

Pauline Treble and Katie Coleborn in Yonderup Cave

A stalagmite in Western Australia has revealed regular, low-intensity fires before European arrival and infrequent, high-intensity fires afterwards.

Andy Baker at the UNSW Connected Waters Initiative in Wellington NSW.

Andy Baker, who researches the water underground, has been recognised by the highly esteemed earth sciences organisation.

Two stalagmites in Yonderup Cave, Yanchep, Western Australia

To look inside a stalagmite is to look back in time tens of thousands of years to see how the Earth’s climate patterns have shaped the world we live in today.

Researchers working at the Patriot Hills Blue Ice Area of Antarctica

New research has shed light on the role sea ice plays in managing atmospheric carbon dioxide levels.

Minaret limestone formations in Jenolan Caves, NSW

Caves are easily forgotten when fire rips through the bush, but despite their robustness the long-term impact of frequent, unprecedented fire seasons presents a new challenge for subsurface geology.

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Global trends in cave waters identify how stalagmites reveal past rainfall and drought patterns.

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Scientists from UNSW and Germany are conducting research this week at Wellington Caves as part of an international project to better understand how changes in climate and land use will impact groundwater.

Artesian bore

Australian reserves of groundwater help earn the nation A$34 billion a year from mining, food production and manufacturing, writes Andy Baker.

Andy Baker

New discoveries concerning the connection between surface and cave climate will help improve the accuracy of climate signals contained in cave formations, write Gabriel Rau, Andy Baker, Mark Cuthbert and Martin Sogaard Andersen.

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