Antarctica

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The Antarctic Treaty was signed 58 years ago today, protecting the continent for peace and science.

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On February 11, 1913, the world woke to the headline “Death of Captain Scott. Lost with four comrades. The Pole reached. Disaster on the return”. A keenly anticipated, privately funded scientific venture “off the map” had turned to tragedy, writes Chris Turney.

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The 1912 death of Scott of the Antarctic and four companions has long been blamed on poor planning by Scott, but documents discovered by a UNSW researcher reveal a different story – and a possible cover up.

ice sheet

New research has prompted warnings that melting Antarctic ice can trigger effects on the other side of the globe. 

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UNSW Sydney scientists studying microbes from some of the saltiest lakes in Antarctica have discovered a new way that the tiny organisms can share DNA that could help them grow and survive.

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The high rate of ice melt along the West Antarctic Peninsula is being driven by strengthening winds on the opposite side of the continent, up to 6000km away, new research suggests.

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UNSW's Matthew England has been awarded the prestigious 2017 Tinker-Muse Prize in recognition of his outstanding research, leadership and advocacy for Antarctic science.

Antarctic ice

Current changes in the ocean around Antarctica are disturbingly close to conditions 14,000 years ago that led to the rapid melting of the Antarctic ice sheets and a three metre rise in global sea levels, new research shows.

Antarctic research

Research expeditions shouldn't need to rely on governments for funding, write Chris Turney and Christopher Fogwill.

Adélie penguin

Adélie penguin numbers at Cape Denison in Antarctica have crashed from more than 160,000 birds in 2011 to just a few thousand following the grounding of a giant iceberg in Commonwealth Bay. 

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