aphantasia

Two skeleton Halloween decorations in neon light

The link between mental imagery and emotions may be closer than we thought.

Early 20th Century brain model

Aphantasia – being blind in the mind’s eye – may be linked to more cognitive functions than previously thought, new research from UNSW Sydney shows.

Is your imagination strong, fuzzy or non-existent?

Highly excitable brain neurons in the visual cortex may reduce a person’s ability to visualise things clearly, neuroscience study finds. 

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To determine why some people cannot create visual images of people, places and things in their mind’s eye, UNSW scientists are planning to conduct a world-first brain imaging study of people with this baffling condition, known as congenital aphantasia.

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Rebecca Keogh and Joel Pearson explore congenital aphantasia – the inability to create visual imagery in the mind's eye.