Ashish Sharma

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UNSW experts are available to comment on the recently announced third La Niña in as many years.

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Australia needs more investment in hydrological modelling and new infrastructure to reduce the impact of major flood events, UNSW expert says.

Sandbags protect a local business as flood water washes by

UNSW experts available to comment on flooding and record rain across NSW and Queensland.

Dark gray-blue storm clouds. La nina and superstorm concept.

UNSW has a range of experts available to comment on La Niña.

Warragamba dam

A study by UNSW engineers suggests we should get used to water restrictions as modelling predicts inflows into natural reservoirs are set to decrease.

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A global study has found a paradox: our water supplies are shrinking at the same time as climate change is generating more intense rain.

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A global analysis of rainfall and rivers by UNSW engineers has discovered a growing pattern of intense flooding in urban areas coupled with drier soils in rural and farming areas.

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Thirty-year weather records from 79 locations across Australia reveal peak downpours during storms are intensifying at warmer temperatures, leading to greater flash flood risks. 

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Dangerous flooding in a future warmer climate may be greater than forecast because of changes to the distribution of rainfall within storms, writes Ashish Sharma and Conrad Wasko.