biodiversity

Okavango delta

A world-first framework will help identify the ecosystems that are most critical for biodiversity conservation, research, management and human wellbeing.

A colourful seahorse swims among the sea life

Partially protected marine areas create confusion and don’t meet their broad conservation objectives, UNSW researchers have found.

A peach quandong fruit

Our medicine, cosmetics and other everyday products contain compounds taken from nature. But Traditional Owners may not have given permission for the materials or their knowledge to be used.

Ferns sprouting after bushfire

From finding packaging solutions in bananas to using citizen science to track bush regeneration, UNSW Sydney researchers are using nature – and each other – to help tackle global problems.

bushfire kangaroo

In a matter of weeks, the fires have subverted decades of dedicated conservation efforts for many threatened species.

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Scientists have shed light on tropical tree deaths – with results predicted to have important implications for managing forest biodiversity.

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NSW's new biodiversity legislation will achieve the opposite of what it is trying to do and will accelerate extinction of native flora and fauna rather than arrest its alarming decline, writes Richard Kingsford.

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Award-winning landscape architect Professor Richard Weller will next week deliver UNSW Built Environment’s Utzon Lecture, Atlas for the End of the World, to mark the 50th anniversary of landscape architecture in Australia.

butterfly

One simple story about butterflies illustrates the complexity of ecosystems and the importance of research in preserving biodiversity, writes Merlin Crossley.

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