Claire Higgins

A mother holding a child next to a fence.

When borders reopen, expanded pathways for refugee admission could help both displaced people and strengthen the Australian community, says a UNSW Law expert.

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The Kaldor Centre's Claire Higgins has gone behind the scenes to take readers into key decision-making moments that shaped Australia's refugee policy.

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Immigration Minister Peter Dutton should learn to live with lawyers who help in matters of life and death, writes Claire Higgins.

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Australia's latest asylum policy appears to be deportation by destitution, writes Claire Higgins.

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The Immigration Minister's reference to 'fake refugees' stands in stark contrast to the principles for Australia’s refugee policy presented to parliament 40 years ago this week, writes Claire Higgins. 

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The Kaldor Centre's Claire Higgins has been awarded a prestigious Fulbright Scholarship to explore how past experiences can help create positive solutions for millions of displaced people.

Syrian refugees

It wouldn’t be the first time Australia’s refugee review system has been politicised. But we should be concerned about the latest changes, writes Claire Higgins.

Refugee

The Australian government's attempt to give unprecedented powers to the private operators of Australia's immigration detention centres looks unlikely to pass the Senate without significant change, write Gabrielle Appleby and Claire Higgins.

refugee boat

Fraser government-era process ensured Australia could respect its obligations under international refugee law, writes Claire Higgins.

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In the 1980s, Australia ran "in-country programs" in strife-torn countries to rescue refugees in humanitarian need. There's no reason why these people smuggling alternatives couldn't happen today, writes Claire Higgins.

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