Claire Higgins

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An ‘orderly departure program’ similar to the one set up after the Vietnam War could offer a vital pathway out of Afghanistan for refugees over the next several years.

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The Home Affairs Minister says Australia is exploring resettlement overseas for 'broad cohorts' of people. But such deals do not get Australia off the hook.

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This excessive spending raises serious raise questions about the government's long-term planning for refugees stuck in limbo.

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If history is any guide, the new US president’s forward-thinking approach toward refugee resettlement could help drive Australia’s commitments to refugee protection, too.

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When borders reopen, expanded pathways for refugee admission could help both displaced people and strengthen the Australian community, says a UNSW Law expert.

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The Kaldor Centre's Claire Higgins has gone behind the scenes to take readers into key decision-making moments that shaped Australia's refugee policy.

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Immigration Minister Peter Dutton should learn to live with lawyers who help in matters of life and death, writes Claire Higgins.

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Australia's latest asylum policy appears to be deportation by destitution, writes Claire Higgins.

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The Immigration Minister's reference to 'fake refugees' stands in stark contrast to the principles for Australia’s refugee policy presented to parliament 40 years ago this week, writes Claire Higgins. 

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The Kaldor Centre's Claire Higgins has been awarded a prestigious Fulbright Scholarship to explore how past experiences can help create positive solutions for millions of displaced people.

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