drought

Australia from space

It's important to remember that most of this greening is due to growth of grasses, which respond more rapidly after rain.

Platypus might become extinct

New UNSW research calls for national action to minimise the risk of the platypus vanishing due to habitat destruction, dams and weirs.

warragamba dam wall

As reserves dwindle, we are becoming increasingly anxious that fresh water will not be reliably available for domestic use, says new UNSW research.

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Climate extremes are killing Australian trees, but we don't know where they're dying. Scientists are asking the public to use their phones to help.

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Global water supplies are shrinking, even as rainfall is rising. The culprit? The drying of soils due to climate change.

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Attempting to tame nature and our land and rivers is an Australian obsession that looks doomed to keep failing.

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Australian wildlife can generally cope with drought, but they're not prepared for the combination of people, introduced animals, and no water.

drought

Droughts are much bigger and slower than other natural disasters that hit Australia but we still haven't figured out how best to protect ourselves, write Anthony Kiem, Fiona Johnson and Seth Westra.

1912 drought

The dominant theme of Australia’s drought history is variability, write Patrick Baker, Chris Turney and Jonathan Palmer.

terrain.jpg

Observations from space have shown the world overall is getting greener despite deforestation and drought, write Yi Liu, Albert Van Dijk and Pep Canadell.

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