emma Johnston

Emma Johnston

When people think of science celebrities, they think of men. Emma Johnston argues that more needs to be done to highlight the role of women in science.

sea microbes

Microbes may be tiny, but their huge number and diversity mean they can be used to identify environmental impacts early, potentially limiting greater harm to larger organisms, write Katherine Dafforn, Emma Johnston, Inke Falkner and Melanie Sun.

Eureka

UNSW scientists working on quantum computing, marine science and threatened ecosystems have won three prestigious Australian Museum Eureka Prizes – for leadership, science communication, and environmental research.

scad.jpg

Partially protected aquatic reserves are failing to protect fish, a survey of marine life on Sydney’s rocky reefs has revealed.

commonwealthbay_2.jpg

The grounding of a giant iceberg in Antarctica has provided a unique real-life experiment that has revealed the vulnerability of marine ecosystems to sudden changes in sea-ice cover.

24_harbour_boats.jpg

UNSW scientists have begun surveying the sea floor in the first comprehensive study of the impact of boating infrastructure on marine habitats in Sydney Harbour.

n93x9gr4-1425439097.jpg

Ecologically sustainable development is just as important below the waterline as it is in our cities and towns, write Katherine Dafforn, Emma Johnston, Joanne Banks and Mariana Mayer-Pinto.

Shine 1

Six UNSW researchers have the honour of speaking at this year’s Science at the Shine Dome event in Canberra - a three-day gathering held by the Australian Aacademy of Science.

Art toxicestuaries 620x349 1

Sydney rock oysters could have a role as biomonitors of the health of our waterways, acting as sensitive indicators of harmful levels of contaminants in water and sediments.

EJ closeup 0

For her exceptional leadership and research, marine ecologist Emma Johnston has won the inaugural Nancy Millis Medal for Women in Science, awarded by the Australian Academy of Science on International Women's Day.

Pages