extinction

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A new article by a UNSW-led team could set a new course for wildlife biologists who are trying to reduce the threat of extinction.

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One simple story about butterflies illustrates the complexity of ecosystems and the importance of research in preserving biodiversity, writes Merlin Crossley.

Daniel Hunter

Scientist and filmmaker Daniel Hunter believes “re-wilding” is the best way to battle the invasive predators driving many species to extinction.

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Abrupt warming that closely resembles the rapid man-made warming occurring today has repeatedly played a key role in mass extinction events of large animals, the megafauna, in the Earth’s past, new research shows.

 

Dingoes Daniel Hunter extinction

Set largely in the Greater Blue Mountains World Heritage Area, this film by UNSW PhD candidate Daniel Hunter explores the role of dingoes in forests and demonstrates their removal is having negative repercussions on ecosystems. The full documentary will be launced at UNSW in May.

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How far should we go to save species from extinction? A new field of research is questioning the ethical and cultural limits of conservation efforts.

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Wildlife photography acts as a torch, shining a light onto the face of extinction so that extraordinary species are not lost to the darkness. But it is then up to the rest of us to act and make a change, writes Dustin Welbourne. 

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Most species of gigantic animals that once roamed Australia had already disappeared by the time people arrived, a major review of the available evidence has concluded.

Frog newsroom

A UNSW-led research team has succeeded in producing early stage cloned embryos containing the DNA of the Australian gastric-brooding frog, which died out 30 years ago.

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The factors involved in the historical decline of contemporary mammals need to be identified to guard against future biodiversity loss, argues Marie Attard.

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