Greg Austin

Malcolm_Turnbull

The succession of data access legislation in the Australian parliament is fast becoming a Mad Hatter's tea party. We need better oversight, and fast, writes Greg Austin.

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Universities are uniquely placed to ensure that those who manage security of networks and data work closely with those who research and study the same problem.

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China's espionage capability is now so extensive it's hard to imagine its limits - and Western companies and governments are becoming more willing participants, writes Greg Austin.

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Australia should play to its strengths to develop and increase exports of its existing expertise in cyber security rather than other military exports, writes Greg Austin.

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An international workshop will encourage Australians to learn from the United States and China regarding radical new measures for cyber security education.

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UNSW Canberra's Professor Greg Austin says that to be prepared for a major war, Australia needs a new cyber military industrial strategy that is independent of the United States.

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The Australian Defence Force's new Information Warfare Division will require time and political capital to shape a capable workforce, writes Greg Austin.

Putin

The prospect of foreign hackers interfering with democracy is not just an American story. It could happen in Australia too, and we need to guard against it, writes Greg Austin.

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Many Australians are frightened by the prospect of terrorism on home soil, but statistics show there's little to worry about, writes Greg Austin.

China cyber crime

It's no surprise that China represents a cyber threat to Australia. The real issue is what are we doing about it, writes Greg Austin.

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