Greg Austin

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Australia should play to its strengths to develop and increase exports of its existing expertise in cyber security rather than other military exports, writes Greg Austin.

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An international workshop will encourage Australians to learn from the United States and China regarding radical new measures for cyber security education.

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UNSW Canberra's Professor Greg Austin says that to be prepared for a major war, Australia needs a new cyber military industrial strategy that is independent of the United States.

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The Australian Defence Force's new Information Warfare Division will require time and political capital to shape a capable workforce, writes Greg Austin.

Putin

The prospect of foreign hackers interfering with democracy is not just an American story. It could happen in Australia too, and we need to guard against it, writes Greg Austin.

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Many Australians are frightened by the prospect of terrorism on home soil, but statistics show there's little to worry about, writes Greg Austin.

China cyber crime

It's no surprise that China represents a cyber threat to Australia. The real issue is what are we doing about it, writes Greg Austin.

China cyber crime

There is a real threat from Chinese ownership of electricity networks such as Ausgrid. The Treasurer needs to be more frank about these threats, writes Greg Austin.

Cyber attack

The US and the UK realise the urgent need for serious investment in cybersecurity. So why is the Australian government taking the issue so lightly, ask Greg Austin and Jill Slay.

submarine

How grounded in strategic reality is the Australian government’s decision to purchase 12 new submarines, asks Greg Austin.

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