Hazel Easthope

A high-density apartment block with closed-in balconies facing a major road

Lower-income households are disproportionally represented in and affected by challenges associated with apartment living, a new report finds. 

apartment construction

The difficulty of finding out about building defects creates an information deficit that threatens public confidence and stability in the apartment market. NSW has begun work on a solution.

housing

Having quality housing matters. What's standing in the way of ensuring every Australian has housing that meets basic comfort and health standards? And how can we overcome these problems?

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Building defects in apartment blocks are far from unusual. We need to identify the systemic flaws contributing to them.

Melbourne apartments.jpg

The combination of higher-density living and increasing cultural diversity means we need to think about how to build social cohesion and make the most of the opportunities of apartment living.

Malaysia Sydney

Migrants can no longer afford to live in the ‘gateway’ suburbs that once helped them to leave the ranks of the ‘disadvantaged’ and feel at home in their new country. 

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UNSW architecture and urban design experts on what they would love to see in their city.

adult children

The stereotype of a dependent generation who won’t leave home ignores the many reasons adult family members choose to live together in the one house, write Edgar Liu and Hazel Easthope.

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Older and less able residents who are having difficulty improving access to their flats are to benefit from the findings of UNSW research.

Apartment inside

Many strata executive committee members are ill-equipped to deal with complex problems that can affect quality of life and property values, new research shows.

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