hepatitis C

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Research from The Kirby Institute released for World Hepatitis Day shows Australia could be one of the first countries in the world to eliminate hepatitis C.

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The newer drugs for hepatitis C might mean fewer people are diagnosed with liver cancer, write Maryam Alavi and Greg Dore.

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More Australians have been treated for hepatitis C in the past 12 months than the last decade combined, following the listing of a new generation therapy on the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme.

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A UNSW research trial to examine if e-cigarettes can help smokers quit and a world-first treatment for teenagers with PTSD and substance abuse are among projects to receive major backing in the latest NHMRC funding round.

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New hepatitis C treatments are expensive but Greg Dore and Marianne Martinello argue that facilitating global access to safe, direct-acting antivirals will herald a revolution. 

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Australian researchers are leading the world in the battle to eliminate hepatitis C.

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An Indigenous hepatitis project in Western Sydney could be expanded across NSW, thanks to input from UNSW health researchers.

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Australian funding of new hepatitis C treatments has provided the therapeutic tools to eliminate the disease as a public health issue within a decade, writes Greg Dore. 

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Australia is on track to eliminate hepatitis C if record numbers of people living with the virus continue to seek and receive breakthrough antiviral treatment, according to a new analysis.

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The Kirby Institute at UNSW has welcomed a $1.4 million gift from the late Dr Lynn Joseph that will help transform the lives of Australians living with hepatitis C.

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