Joel Pearson

Two skeleton Halloween decorations in neon light

The link between mental imagery and emotions may be closer than we thought.

Young woman with hand up to face amid distorted reflections

Neuroscientists say the best way to study hallucinations is via lab models where they can be induced in anyone, anytime.

Gas bubbles in ice sample

The most-read stories of 2020 take us from the depths of the mind to the edges of the universe.

Pink origami elephant on black background

Why is it so hard to control our thoughts? New research led by UNSW Sydney shows suppressed thoughts could be hiding in the visual part of our brains – without us even knowing.

Early 20th Century brain model

Aphantasia – being blind in the mind’s eye – may be linked to more cognitive functions than previously thought, new research from UNSW Sydney shows.

Is your imagination strong, fuzzy or non-existent?

Highly excitable brain neurons in the visual cortex may reduce a person’s ability to visualise things clearly, neuroscience study finds. 

190430_suppressedthoughts.jpg

UNSW psychology researchers have found evidence that controlling one’s own thinking can be thwarted by thoughts we do not even know are there.

joel_pearson_future_minds_lab.jpg

The new UNSW project will use cutting edge neuroscience to advise how businesses can thrive in a world of constant technological change.

190306_preconsciousthoughts.jpg

We like to think that we are in the driver’s seat when it comes to the choice and strength of our everyday thoughts, but new research from UNSW suggests they might be more automatic and unconscious than we think.

eye_two_2.jpg

To determine why some people cannot create visual images of people, places and things in their mind’s eye, UNSW scientists are planning to conduct a world-first brain imaging study of people with this baffling condition, known as congenital aphantasia.

Pages