Joel Pearson

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UNSW psychology researchers have found evidence that controlling one’s own thinking can be thwarted by thoughts we do not even know are there.

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The new UNSW project will use cutting edge neuroscience to advise how businesses can thrive in a world of constant technological change.

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We like to think that we are in the driver’s seat when it comes to the choice and strength of our everyday thoughts, but new research from UNSW suggests they might be more automatic and unconscious than we think.

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To determine why some people cannot create visual images of people, places and things in their mind’s eye, UNSW scientists are planning to conduct a world-first brain imaging study of people with this baffling condition, known as congenital aphantasia.

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Rebecca Keogh and Joel Pearson explore congenital aphantasia – the inability to create visual imagery in the mind's eye.

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Renowned British primatologist Jane Goodall and American physicist Brian Greene are among leading international scientists who will give talks in Sydney this year through UNSW Science partnerships.

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Our study published this week shows a new method to induce and measure visual hallucinations in anyone at any time, writes Joel Pearson.

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A new method for inducing visual hallucinations in healthy individuals could lead to new treatments for controlling them in people with Parkinson’s disease, UNSW researchers say.  

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Our ability to visually interpret the environment around us is easily taken for granted. But what about when we start to see things that aren’t there?