Megan Davis

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Four UNSW academics have been elected to the Academy of the Social Sciences in Australia in recognition of their contributions to their disciplines and to society.

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As 300 Aboriginal people and Torres Strait Islanders gather at Uluru, Harry Hobbs explains the role of this First Nations Convention in the process of constitutional reform.

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Law Professor Megan Davis says it will be an honour in her new role to showcase and develop UNSW research across important areas of Indigenous policy, while nurturing Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander scholars.

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Public policy no longer requires the imprimatur of the Aboriginal people; Aboriginal participation in the decisions taken about their lives is negligible, writes Megan Davis.

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UNSW Professor Megan Davis says she is cautiously optimistic about Indigenous constitutional reform, despite a growing resistance movement and Indigenous ambivalence.

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Despair. In a word, this is the universal sentiment of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander leaders I have spoken to about the state of Aboriginal policy in Australia, writes Megan Davis.

Megan Davis

When it comes to Indigenous recognition, there is far too much reliance on the constitution to achieve things it simply cannot do, writes Megan Davis.

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The first Aboriginal Australian elected to a United Nations body is leading 
the push for public law solutions to the nation’s most serious and long-standing human rights issue.

Megan Davis

Should the referendum on Indigenous recognition be defeated, Australians would be branded to the world as self-conscious and deliberate racists, write Megan Davis and Marcia Langton.

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