Megan Davis

Dancer at the Uluru Constitutional Convention 2017, the Uluru Statement in the Background

The Uluru Dialogue group based at UNSW Indigenous Law Centre says constitutional recognition cannot be dislocated from the idea of a Voice to Parliament.

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There is a quiet process underway, aimed at achieving the recognition of the First Nations that has so far eluded Australia.

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Professor Megan Davis, the author of the independent review into Aboriginal children and young people in out-of-home care, says the government needs to “implement recommendations and announce the way forward”.

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Professor Megan Davis, Pro Vice-Chancellor Indigenous and Professor of Law at UNSW Sydney, has today been named the Balnaves Chair in Constitutional Law.

Uluru Statement from the Heart

Australians have been working towards meaningful change for almost a decade. That cannot be derailed by reverting to symbolic recognition.

Megan Davis

UNSW Sydney Pro Vice-Chancellor (Indigenous), Professor Megan Davis, has won top honours in The Australian Financial Review/Qantas 100 Women of Influence Awards.

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Four UNSW academics have been elected to the Academy of the Social Sciences in Australia in recognition of their contributions to their disciplines and to society.

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As 300 Aboriginal people and Torres Strait Islanders gather at Uluru, Harry Hobbs explains the role of this First Nations Convention in the process of constitutional reform.

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Law Professor Megan Davis says it will be an honour in her new role to showcase and develop UNSW research across important areas of Indigenous policy, while nurturing Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander scholars.

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Public policy no longer requires the imprimatur of the Aboriginal people; Aboriginal participation in the decisions taken about their lives is negligible, writes Megan Davis.

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