Michael Legg

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The Australian Law Reform Commission report looked into concerns that lawyer and funder profits were being prioritised over claimants’ interests

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UNSW Law is leading research into how artificial intelligence is changing work for lawyers and how we all have access to justice.

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A review of UNSW's Law curriculum aims to prepare students for the changes to the law and the legal profession caused by digital disruption.

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The CBA's response to AUSTRAC's claims means shareholders will be assisted in part of their class action claims but a lot still needs to be proved, write Michael Legg and James D Metzger.

Blind justice

Class actions through the courts seem unable to deliver compensation as cheaply as resolution schemes, writes Michael Legg.

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In class actions where there is substantial risk, the challenge is to ensure lawyers fees are charged in an appropriate manner that is fair to both lawyer and client, writes Michael Legg

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In the early to mid-2000s, governments throughout Australia introduced reforms restricting rights to claim for negligence. Now they are slowly being unwound, writes Michael Legg.

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It is not sufficient for boards to merely rely on the existence of company insider-trading policies as a defensive mechanism, write Tim L'Estrange and Michael Legg.  

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The ubiquity of electronically stored information, such as email, has created an increased risk that material exempt from discovery due to client legal privilege will not be properly protected, writes Michael Legg. 

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A focus on the large settlement payments in class actions misses a more important question: what proportion of shareholders’ actual losses is being compensated, asks Michael Legg.

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