Mike Letnic

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Small native mammals eat more plant seeds than had been realised, and their loss to predators such as foxes and feral cats has likely caused significant changes to vegetation in outback Australia.

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The dingo has a far greater impact on the Australian landscape than previously thought, new research reveals.

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A comparison of conditions on either side of Australia’s dingo fence has revealed that extermination of these apex predators affects not only the abundance of other animals and plants, but also the quality of the soil.

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Australia's arid grasslands are being invaded – by native shrubs and trees, write Mike Letnic and Christopher Edward Gordon.

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Bold solutions are required to save Australia's native mammals, write Daniel Hunter and Mike Letnic. 

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Returning the Tasmanian devil to mainland habitats where dingoes have been culled will improve biodiversity outcomes, UNSW researchers say.  

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UNSW scientists will reintroduce burrowing bettongs, bilbies and other native mammals into large, predator-free enclosures in the state's west, as part of a new NSW Government initiative to protect threatened species.

Cane Toad

The cane toad's diet of dung beetles in Australia's tropical rangelands could be having a serious impact on cattle health,  a UNSW-led study suggests.

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It will not be simple or cheap, but fencing dams in arid areas could create "cane toad breaks" to halt the march of these invaders across the continent, writes Mike Letnic  

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Erecting fences to stop cane toads entering man-made dams to cool down in hot, dry parts of Australia is an effective way to stop their spread, UNSW-led research shows.

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