privacy

A man looking at his computer screen with a padlock on it.

People may consent to the use of their personal data, without being sufficiently aware or informed of the nature and extent of potential implications.

Young man on mobile phone in the street

Australian governments need to demonstrate that any proposed contact tracing app is necessary, proportionate and voluntary with appropriate legal guarantees, says UNSW professor of law and information systems.

Woman with mobile phone

The government is working on an app to track our contacts but, first, it will need to pick up its privacy act.

Camera surveillance

With Australia’s facial verification bill currently in draft, UNSW Senior Lecturer Dr Carmen Leong addresses how mass surveillance technology could impact the economy.

police in uniform

A report by UNSW Law academics Michael Grewcock and Vicki Sentas says the law does not give police clear guidance on conducting strip searches.

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Algorithmic guardians could be programmed to manage our digital interactions with social platforms and apps according to our personal preferences.

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Some Australian Facebook users are more worried about over-sharing by friends than the privacy and security of their personal information.

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Blockchain data is unchangeable, which is a problem when privacy laws require companies to delete data once it’s served its purpose.

Malcolm_Turnbull

The succession of data access legislation in the Australian parliament is fast becoming a Mad Hatter's tea party. We need better oversight, and fast, writes Greg Austin.

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Consumers should not be blamed for failing to read online privacy policies. Instead, the system needs to be fixed.

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