Quantum Computing

illustration showing how multiple qubits might be controlled using the new process

Discovery of previously unknown effect makes compact, ultra-fast control of spin qubits possible.

Andrea Morello stands in front of a transparent blackboard to explain Maxwell's Demon

UNSW Sydney research demonstrates a 20x improvement in resetting a quantum bit to its ‘0’ state, using a modern version of the ‘Maxwell’s demon’.

An artist's impression of a silicon chip among lights and colours

UNSW engineers have substantially extended the time that their quantum computing processors can hold information by more than 100 times compared to previous results.

lead researcher michelle simmons

Quantum computing hardware specialists at UNSW have built a quantum processor in silicon to simulate an organic molecule with astounding precision.

Asaad Serwan, Andrea Morello and Mateusz Mądzik among their quantum computing equipment

UNSW Sydney-led research paves the way for large silicon-based quantum processors for real-world manufacturing and application.

Asaad Serwan, Andrea Morello and Mateusz Mądzik among their quantum computing equipment

UNSW Sydney-led research paves the way for large silicon-based quantum processors for real-world manufacturing and application.

Professor Morello in laboratory

A UNSW quantum engineer has been awarded for his exemplary contribution to public engagement in physics. 

Physics AIP Awards

UNSW researchers have won medals from the Australian Institute of Physics, including for excellence in research.

Michelle Simmons

The internationally renowned UNSW Scientia Professor is recognised for creating the field of atomic electronics.

Dr Jarryd Pla and Prof. Andrew Dzurak look from behind a transparent screen showing mathematical workings

A decades-old problem about how to reliably control millions of qubits in a silicon quantum computer chip has now been solved.

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