refugees

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The Federal Government is trying to put a positive spin on the fact that it wants to make it even harder for asylum seekers to find protection in accordance with international law, writes Jane McAdam.

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The asylum bill introduced into Parliament last week is an extraordinary display of disdain for international law – and its fundamental misunderstanding of it, writes Jane McAdam.

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The federal government may have to release or process thousands of asylum seekers, following a High Court ruling that sets significant new limits on the policy of indefinite detention, writes Joyce Chia. 

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Admiral Chris Barrie has described Australia’s asylum seeker policies and treatment of refugees as “a mess” which reflects badly on all Australians. 

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If we are to develop a sustainable, long-term approach to asylum seeker policy, we need to have a new conversation that draws on the common sense, generosity and pragmatism of ordinary Australians, write Jane McAdam, Travers McLeod and Bob Douglas.

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More than 50 legal scholars from 17 Australian universites have written an open letter condemning the federal government's return of asylum seekers to Sri Lanka.  

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Retrograde provisions in a bill introduced this week by the Immigration Minister will have major consequences for asylum seekers entitled to Australia's protection, write Jane McAdam and Kerry Murphy.

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Without a proper refugee status determination procedure, asylum seekers are left in indefinite detention with no certainty about (or control over) their future, writes Claire Higgins.

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At a cost of A$826 million, the processing and detention of around 2,500 asylum seekers on Nauru and Manus Island is a scandalous waste of taxpayers' money, write Joyce Chia and Claire Higgins.

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With Australia’s main political parties overwhelmingly in favour of indefinite detention for refugees with an adverse security assessment, the High Court offers the final hope for a fair go, writes George Williams.

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