School of Built Environment

Light coloured roofs stay cool during summer

Outdoor air temperature and cooling energy consumption can be significantly reduced by solar reflective material, research finds.

Congested traffic on the M1 highway

Our survey found strong opposition to Australian megacities, with most people preferring population growth to be in satellite cities and rail hubs outside the capitals.

Peyman Mostaghimi

Academics, PhD candidates and alumni will travel to US research institutions and organisations under the flagship foreign exchange program.

a montage of a city on the water at day and night

The next generation of supercooling materials can help keep cities cooler in summer and warmer in winter.

sydney city skyline at night

Computational design can identify greater efficiencies across the built environment, enabling us to create more sustainable cities.

a road sign all but submerged in floodwaters

Hospitals will have to plan for larger floods – and find ways to safely evacuate staff and patients.

Scientia Building at Kensington Campus

This 2022 round of grants will support research across UNSW Sydney’s six faculties, with topics ranging from cooling technologies for urban heat mitigation to systemic risk in insurance.

man at home on sofa listening to music with a smartphone

UNSW Arts, Design & Architecture stories explored a range of ideas, from purpose-built quarantine facilities to whether artificial intelligence could create art.

Prof. Ford and Prof. Freestone

Two UNSW Sydney professors are recognised for their outstanding contribution to the humanities.

sydney city cbd silhouette

New building materials that reflect rather than absorb solar energy can reduce peak temperatures in our cities by up to four degrees. 

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