stress

Woman looking out of the window

UNSW researchers share tips on ways to cope with anxiety and stress during COVID–19.

ageing

Emerging evidence suggests that prolonged stress exposure can accelerate the ticking rate of an internal cellular clock. By doing so, stress can contribute to faster ageing and body deterioration.

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When teachers are more adaptable, they're better able to respond to the changing nature of teaching, and navigate a complex workplace.

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For the first time, Australian researchers have found a link between a father's stress levels and learning and memory ability in his offspring and that these negative effects can be reversed by probiotics.

work stress

Working in a stress-free environment might sound appealing. But new research shows most of us need a little bit of pressure to get the job done.

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We all know that cola and lemonade aren’t great for our waistline or teeth, but a new study on rats sheds light on just how much damage sugary drinks can do to the brain, write Jayanthi Maniam and Margaret Morris.

stress

A reasonable level of workplace pressure can lift performance, UNSW research shows.

stressed student

A survey of Year 12 students from schools across Sydney found 42% registered anxiety symptoms high enough to be of clinical concern, write Ben North, Miraca Gross and Susen Smith.

Morris comfort inside

Medical researchers have for the first time demonstrated that "comfort eating" can reverse the effects in the brain of psychological trauma experienced early in life.

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BlackBerry use is on the rise and the way people are using this palm-sized email device is having a significant impact, according to UNSW research.