Utzon Lecture

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Award winning Dutch architect Francine Houben will explain her humanistic approach in the next UNSW Built Environment UTZON Lecture.

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Celebrated landscape architect, artist and designer Professor Walter Hood explores how public space can embrace the past, present and future, in the next instalment of UNSW Built Environment's UTZON Lecture Series. 

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By implementing local technologies, Australia could become a world leader in climate change, says Scientia Professor Mat Santamouris, who will present the next instalment of the Utzon Lecture Series at UNSW.

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World-leading Spanish architect Carme Pinós will explain the philosophy behind her design of this year’s MPavilion in her upcoming UNSW Utzon lecture.

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With monsoon flooding and natural disasters in South Asia increasing in scale and severity, what can architects and urban planners do to make a difference?

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Nina-Marie Lister, a planner and ecologist at Ryerson University in Toronto, will on Wednesday deliver UNSW Built Environment’s next Utzon Lecture, Resilience beyond rhetoric: Design for a new sustainability.

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Award-winning landscape architect Professor Richard Weller will next week deliver UNSW Built Environment’s Utzon Lecture, Atlas for the End of the World, to mark the 50th anniversary of landscape architecture in Australia.

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The energy consumption of buildings and their contribution to energy poverty and climate change is the topic of UNSW's next Utzon Lecture, tonight Wednesday 28 September.

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As technology rapidly changes the way we interact with products and environments, UNSW's Oya Demirbilek will use her Utzon lecture to discuss the impact of good design on our health and happiness.

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In the face of unprecedented urban migration, architects have a critical role to play in making our cities more resilient, says international disaster risk-reduction expert David Sanderson.

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