Veena Sahajwalla

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Throwing away clothing that's no longer needed is a missed opportunity to turn the fabrics into new products such as building materials.

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Scientia Professor Veena Sahajwalla's work to revolutionise recycling via groundbreaking technologies developed at UNSW is being heard by a new, younger audience.

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Waste microfactories can transform the manufacturing landscape in Australia, especially in remote locations where waste transportation and processing are expensive.

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People are losing confidence in recycling and overwhelmingly want government to support solutions such as UNSW's groundbreaking microfactory technology, a new survey shows.

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For their outstanding research on psychological responses to trauma, recycling science, and nanomaterials, three UNSW scientists have been elected as Fellows of the Australian Academy of Science.

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The world’s first microfactory that can transform the components from electronic waste (e-waste) items such as discarded smart phones and laptops into valuable materials for re-use has been launched at UNSW Sydney, with the Minister for the Environment, Gabrielle Upton, in attendance.

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The Australian Human Rights Institute is a new initiative at UNSW Sydney that is bringing together researchers from different disciplines to find solutions to human rights challenges.

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Australia has presented India’s Narendra Modi with replica Mahatma Gandhi spectacles – made entirely from waste using breakthrough recycling technology developed at UNSW.

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UNSW has launched an initiative to address the gender gap in entrepreneurship and encourage more female students into the technology-based startup economy.

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There’s much more at stake at Australian steelmaker Arrium than today’s jobs, writes Veena Sahajwalla.

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