Opinion

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Rosemary Stanton investigates the health claims associated with the apple cider vinegar diet fad.

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With the end of 2017 in sight, Richard Holden looks at five issues to watch for in 2018.

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Government policy change to allow open banking will benefit Australian consumers by shifting control to the customer, writes Ross Buckley.

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New technology using digital DNA and satellite data could help save lives by predicting the route of airborne pollen, writes Nicholas Osborne.

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Australian laws fare poorly when it comes to religious liberty. The right way forward is to protect religious freedom in a law that also recognises other fundamental rights, writes George Williams.

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While research provides some evidence that lithium protects the brain from dementia, its potentially harmful effects to other organs needs to be studied before it is added to drinking water, writes Perminder Sachdev.

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Increasing the overall housing stock won't ensure an increase in availability of affordable housing. Governments need to need to have a much sharper policy focus on this issue, writes Hal Pawson.

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Despite the layers of discrimination faced by refugee women and girls, they are not just passive victims, write Linda Bartolomei and Eileen Pittaway.

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Australia continues to create jobs, but wages aren’t keeping up and policymakers are running out of options, writes Richard Holden.

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Screening prospective parents for genetic mutations allows them to make important decisions about the health of their future families.

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